drought

Center to Host Speaker Series on Drought

The Center for Watershed Sciences and UC Davis School of Law is hosting a weekly series of public speakers on California water policy this winter, beginning Jan. 4, 2016.

The California Water Policy Seminar Series is on Mondays, 4:10 pm to 5:30 pm, at 2303 King Hall.

Click here for the series schedule, topics, and speakers.

The series is open to the public and available for credit. [For an extended graduate seminar on water policy (1 unit ECI 298) contact Professor Lund at jrlund@ucdavis.edu.]

Nov. 18: 'Facing El Nino – Challenges & Opportunities'

WHAT: Interdisciplinary presentations and panel discussions on the prospects, challenges and opportunities of California having an El Niño event with heavy precipitation this winter.

WHEN: 3:30 p.m.— 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015

WHERE: Walter A Buehler Alumni Center, UC Davis

PLEASE NOTE: Seating is limited. Advanced registration required. Registration is free and available by emailing elninosummit@ucdavis.edu

Drought bites harder, but agriculture remains robust

 

The drought is tightening its grip on California agriculture, squeezing about 30 percent more workers and cropland out of production than in 2014, according to the latest drought impact report by the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences. In 2015, the state’s agricultural economy will lose about $1.84 billion and 10,100 seasonal jobs because of the drought, the report estimated, with the Central Valley hardest hit. The analysis also forecasts how the industry will fare if the drought persists through 2017.

Could California survive a mega-drought?

UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences Director Jay Lund told KXTL News 10 (ABC, Sacramento) Thursday that if California faced a 100-year drought, it could lose up to half of its agriculture.

"But most of the urban economy, while it would be painful, would get through pretty well," Lund said. "We'd certainly use a lot less water on our lawns, pay more for water, do a lot more water conservation, do a lot more waste water re-use."

UC Davis tapped for groundwater expertise

UC Davis water scientists are helping to shape a comprehensive groundwater management system for California, designed to halt the pump-as-you-please approach that’s sucking wells dry during the drought. Thomas Harter is helping to coordinate teams from the Center for Watershed Sciences and the UC Cooperative Extension Groundwater Hydrology Program.