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Projects Worked On

Project Name Description
Sacramento River Flood Control Project

California is looking to expand the Sacramento River Flood Control Project, partly as a defense against severe storms in a changing climate. This study creates a model of the Project for exploring various scenarios. Researchers are analyzing how the system's bypass channels and weirs interact during big storms and how expansions of these structures might reduce flood damage at various locations in the Sacramento Valley and the Delta. 

Resources:

 

Yolo Bypass: Managing a floodplain for multiple uses

This study will present a decision-making framework for balancing ecosystem and economic goals on the Yolo Bypass, a promising site for habitat restoration in the San Francisco Bay-Delta system. The bypass's primary purpose is to provide flood control for Sacramento, but it's also used for farming, duck hunting and bird-watching. We're developing an optimilization model to explore when, where and how floodwaters might most economically be applied to manage all the diverse activities.

 

The video (above) demonstrates our application of a newly developed flood simulation software (HEC-RAS-2D) to the Yolo Bypass. The model will help us determine whether solutions from the optimization analysis are realistic. If an optimal solution calls for engineered modifications to the floodplain, we can use the model to test the effects of those potential changes. The decision-making framework and tools we develop will be applicable to other floodplain restoration efforts in California and elsewhere.

 

Related news and commentary:

CALVIN

California’s complex water management system often defies comprehensive analysis. We summarize the results of a decade of quantification and analysis of this system from a hydro-economic perspective using the CALVIN Model.

The general approach taken dates back to Roman times, when Frontinus (97 AD) began his oversight of Rome’s water system with a systematic inventory and quantification of its water infrastructure. 

This approach has been formalized and expanded in the modern era as economists, planners, and engineers have sought to grapple with complex water management systems and problems.

In California water supply and demand is inconvenient in both space and time. Most water availability is in northern California from winter precipitation and spring snow-melt; whereas water demands are more in the south during the dry summer. Major floods and seasonal and multiyear droughts further complicate water resource management in California. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is the major north-south hub for this water network.

Population growth, climate change, a vulnerable Delta, and decentralized water governance pose opportunities and challenges to water management in California. Portfolios of water management activities, including diverse general policy tools, demand management, and operations and supply expansion options, are available to manage competing demands in complex situations.

Exploring promising portfolios of actions is the main intent of the CALVIN model. The CALVIN model is an economic-engineering optimization model of California developed at the University of California – Davis. CALVIN’s major innovations are its statewide (rather than project) scale, representation of a broad range of water management options, explicit integration of broad economic objectives, and its consequent applicability to a wide variety of policy, operations, and planning problems.

CALVIN

California’s complex water management system often defies comprehensive analysis. We summarize the results of a decade of quantification and analysis of this system from a hydro-economic perspective using the CALVIN Model.

The general approach taken dates back to Roman times, when Frontinus (97 AD) began his oversight of Rome’s water system with a systematic inventory and quantification of its water infrastructure. 

This approach has been formalized and expanded in the modern era as economists, planners, and engineers have sought to grapple with complex water management systems and problems.

In California water supply and demand is inconvenient in both space and time. Most water availability is in northern California from winter precipitation and spring snow-melt; whereas water demands are more in the south during the dry summer. Major floods and seasonal and multiyear droughts further complicate water resource management in California. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is the major north-south hub for this water network.

Population growth, climate change, a vulnerable Delta, and decentralized water governance pose opportunities and challenges to water management in California. Portfolios of water management activities, including diverse general policy tools, demand management, and operations and supply expansion options, are available to manage competing demands in complex situations.

Exploring promising portfolios of actions is the main intent of the CALVIN model. The CALVIN model is an economic-engineering optimization model of California developed at the University of California – Davis. CALVIN’s major innovations are its statewide (rather than project) scale, representation of a broad range of water management options, explicit integration of broad economic objectives, and its consequent applicability to a wide variety of policy, operations, and planning problems.

CALVIN

California’s complex water management system often defies comprehensive analysis. We summarize the results of a decade of quantification and analysis of this system from a hydro-economic perspective using the CALVIN Model.

The general approach taken dates back to Roman times, when Frontinus (97 AD) began his oversight of Rome’s water system with a systematic inventory and quantification of its water infrastructure. 

This approach has been formalized and expanded in the modern era as economists, planners, and engineers have sought to grapple with complex water management systems and problems.

In California water supply and demand is inconvenient in both space and time. Most water availability is in northern California from winter precipitation and spring snow-melt; whereas water demands are more in the south during the dry summer. Major floods and seasonal and multiyear droughts further complicate water resource management in California. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is the major north-south hub for this water network.

Population growth, climate change, a vulnerable Delta, and decentralized water governance pose opportunities and challenges to water management in California. Portfolios of water management activities, including diverse general policy tools, demand management, and operations and supply expansion options, are available to manage competing demands in complex situations.

Exploring promising portfolios of actions is the main intent of the CALVIN model. The CALVIN model is an economic-engineering optimization model of California developed at the University of California – Davis. CALVIN’s major innovations are its statewide (rather than project) scale, representation of a broad range of water management options, explicit integration of broad economic objectives, and its consequent applicability to a wide variety of policy, operations, and planning problems.

Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water

One in 10 people living in California’s most productive agricultural areas is at risk of exposure to harmful levels of nitrate contamination in their drinking water, according to a report released today by the University of California, Davis. The report was commissioned by the State Water Resources Control Board.

The report, “Addressing Nitrate in California’s Drinking Water,” is the first comprehensive scientific investigation of nitrate contamination in the Tulare Lake Basin, which includes Fresno and Bakersfield, and the Salinas Valley, which includes Salinas and areas near Monterey. It defines the extent of the problem, suggests promising solutions and outlines possible funding mechanisms.

Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water

One in 10 people living in California’s most productive agricultural areas is at risk of exposure to harmful levels of nitrate contamination in their drinking water, according to a report released today by the University of California, Davis. The report was commissioned by the State Water Resources Control Board.

The report, “Addressing Nitrate in California’s Drinking Water,” is the first comprehensive scientific investigation of nitrate contamination in the Tulare Lake Basin, which includes Fresno and Bakersfield, and the Salinas Valley, which includes Salinas and areas near Monterey. It defines the extent of the problem, suggests promising solutions and outlines possible funding mechanisms.

Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water

One in 10 people living in California’s most productive agricultural areas is at risk of exposure to harmful levels of nitrate contamination in their drinking water, according to a report released today by the University of California, Davis. The report was commissioned by the State Water Resources Control Board.

The report, “Addressing Nitrate in California’s Drinking Water,” is the first comprehensive scientific investigation of nitrate contamination in the Tulare Lake Basin, which includes Fresno and Bakersfield, and the Salinas Valley, which includes Salinas and areas near Monterey. It defines the extent of the problem, suggests promising solutions and outlines possible funding mechanisms.

Addressing Nitrate in California's Drinking Water

One in 10 people living in California’s most productive agricultural areas is at risk of exposure to harmful levels of nitrate contamination in their drinking water, according to a report released today by the University of California, Davis. The report was commissioned by the State Water Resources Control Board.

The report, “Addressing Nitrate in California’s Drinking Water,” is the first comprehensive scientific investigation of nitrate contamination in the Tulare Lake Basin, which includes Fresno and Bakersfield, and the Salinas Valley, which includes Salinas and areas near Monterey. It defines the extent of the problem, suggests promising solutions and outlines possible funding mechanisms.

California Water Myths

In collaboration with the Public Policy Institute of California and other researchers, the Center prepared California Water Myths—a report highlighting eight common water myths, focusing on water supply, ecosystems and legal and governance issues. In providing information to combat these myths, the study establishes a more informed approach to water policy and management in California.

Myths of California Water: Virtual Tour was created as a interactive companion to the California Water Myths report. Experience aerial views of California in locations that relate to the myths and get in-depth information about the realities that combat these myths. The tour also provides links to visual images and further reading.

California Water Myths

In collaboration with the Public Policy Institute of California and other researchers, the Center prepared California Water Myths—a report highlighting eight common water myths, focusing on water supply, ecosystems and legal and governance issues. In providing information to combat these myths, the study establishes a more informed approach to water policy and management in California.

Myths of California Water: Virtual Tour was created as a interactive companion to the California Water Myths report. Experience aerial views of California in locations that relate to the myths and get in-depth information about the realities that combat these myths. The tour also provides links to visual images and further reading.