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Projects as the Primary Contact

One in 10 people living in California’s most productive agricultural areas is at risk of exposure to harmful levels of nitrate contamination in their drinking water, according to a report released today by the University of California, Davis. The report was commissioned by the State Water Resources Control Board.
To more accurately estimate the threat posed by sea level rise and intense storms to coastal infrastructure, this research will provide assess coastal flood risk accounting for changing climate patterns, erosion rates, shifting beach forms, and vertical land movement. Methods will be developed to support site-specific, project level assessments of coastal vulnerabilities to sea level rise through integration of models of projected sea level rise and climate scenarios, coupled with local and regional-scale erosion rates and vertical land motion estimates.
In collaboration with the Public Policy Institute of California and other researchers, the Center prepared California Water Myths—a report highlighting eight common water myths, focusing on water supply, ecosystems and legal and governance issues. In providing information to combat these myths, the study establishes a more informed approach to water policy and management in California.
California’s complex water management system often defies comprehensive analysis. We summarize the results of a decade of quantification and analysis of this system from a hydro-economic perspective using the CALVIN Model.
California is looking to expand the Sacramento River Flood Control Project, partly as a defense against severe storms in a changing climate. This study creates a model of the Project for exploring various scenarios. Researchers are analyzing how the system's bypass channels and weirs interact during big storms and how expansions of these structures might reduce flood damage at various locations in the Sacramento Valley and the Delta.
This website provides and overview and resources on the Statewide Agricultural Production Model (SWAP).
This study will present a decision-making framework for balancing ecosystem and economic goals on the Yolo Bypass, a promising site for habitat restoration in the San Francisco Bay-Delta system. The bypass's primary purpose is to provide flood control for Sacramento, but it's also used for farming, duck hunting and bird-watching. We're developing an optimilization model to explore when, where and how floodwaters might most economically be applied to manage all the diverse activities.
 

Collaborating on the following Projects

One in 10 people living in California’s most productive agricultural areas is at risk of exposure to harmful levels of nitrate contamination in their drinking water, according to a report released today by the University of California, Davis. The report was commissioned by the State Water Resources Control Board.
To more accurately estimate the threat posed by sea level rise and intense storms to coastal infrastructure, this research will provide assess coastal flood risk accounting for changing climate patterns, erosion rates, shifting beach forms, and vertical land movement. Methods will be developed to support site-specific, project level assessments of coastal vulnerabilities to sea level rise through integration of models of projected sea level rise and climate scenarios, coupled with local and regional-scale erosion rates and vertical land motion estimates.
In collaboration with the Public Policy Institute of California and other researchers, the Center prepared California Water Myths—a report highlighting eight common water myths, focusing on water supply, ecosystems and legal and governance issues. In providing information to combat these myths, the study establishes a more informed approach to water policy and management in California.
California’s complex water management system often defies comprehensive analysis. We summarize the results of a decade of quantification and analysis of this system from a hydro-economic perspective using the CALVIN Model.
This research project was convened by the Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California Davis with financial support from the California State Water Resources Control Board Office of the Delta Watermaster and other agencies. Its objective is to develop a better understanding of consumptive water use in the Delta by coordinating modeling, measurement, and other information from a variety of independent research and estimation efforts.
UC Davis researchers forecast the socio-economic effects of the drought on California agriculture for 2014 and beyond. Economists use computer models and the latest estimates of water deliveries, well-pumping capacities and acres fallowed. The researchers exploit new satellite remote-sensing technologies to estimate fallowed acreage as the drought unfolds.
Water resource management in California is often extensive and complex and deserves a comprehensive data and modeling approach. The Hobbes Project is a new effort to provide a venue for modelers in California and elsewhere to create an open, organized and documented quantitative representation of the state's intertied water resources system. Geocoded elements in this database can be interactively converted into tiered networks able to be solved by multiple modeling platforms depending on user preferences, with the appropriate translators. Many Hobbes tools will be web-based with exporting capabilities to the most common analytical and modeling software.
The National Science Foundation is sponsoring an Integrated Modeling Workshop to explore ways to improve the development and application of modeling for multipurpose management of changing estuarine systems. The two-day workshop will bring together experts from Europe, Asia and across the U.S. Potential solutions will be identified and discussed from multiple perspectives: government, academia, NGOs, consultants and stakeholders.
California is looking to expand the Sacramento River Flood Control Project, partly as a defense against severe storms in a changing climate. This study creates a model of the Project for exploring various scenarios. Researchers are analyzing how the system's bypass channels and weirs interact during big storms and how expansions of these structures might reduce flood damage at various locations in the Sacramento Valley and the Delta.
This website provides and overview and resources on the Statewide Agricultural Production Model (SWAP).
This technical workshop in collaboration with the California Water and Enviornmental Modeling Forum (CWEMF). This workshop presents various alternatives for modeling the economics of water use and water scarcity within an agricultural production setting, with a particular focus on California.
This study will present a decision-making framework for balancing ecosystem and economic goals on the Yolo Bypass, a promising site for habitat restoration in the San Francisco Bay-Delta system. The bypass's primary purpose is to provide flood control for Sacramento, but it's also used for farming, duck hunting and bird-watching. We're developing an optimilization model to explore when, where and how floodwaters might most economically be applied to manage all the diverse activities.